Dr. Siddiqui on Likely Candidates to Develop Prostate Cancer

Mohummad Minhaj Siddiqui, MD
Published Online: Monday, Mar 02, 2015



Mohummad Minhaj Siddiqui, MD, assistant professor of surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, director of urologic robotic surgery, University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, discusses a study which demonstrated men with testicular cancer are more likely to develop prostate cancer.

It has previously been noted that men with testicular cancer have a slightly increased risk of developing intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer, Siddiqui explains. No known biological mechanism is known. However, Siddiqui adds that in both prostate and testicular cancer, the hormonal axis is affected.

In this study, Siddiqui and his colleagues used a SEER database and created two cohorts: men with a history of testicular cancer, and a controlled population with melanoma. Melanoma was used, he explains, because it has a significant amount of survivors and has no known association with prostate cancer. After examining both cohorts, Siddiqui says there was an overall increase in prostate cancer in the testicular cancer arm vs the controlled population.

Intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer was defined by a Gleason score of 7 or that greater than or equal to 8.

Additional subanalyses were conducted to identify other common risk factors such as age, radiation exposure, and race.

<<< View more from the 2015 GU Cancer Symposium



Mohummad Minhaj Siddiqui, MD, assistant professor of surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, director of urologic robotic surgery, University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, discusses a study which demonstrated men with testicular cancer are more likely to develop prostate cancer.

It has previously been noted that men with testicular cancer have a slightly increased risk of developing intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer, Siddiqui explains. No known biological mechanism is known. However, Siddiqui adds that in both prostate and testicular cancer, the hormonal axis is affected.

In this study, Siddiqui and his colleagues used a SEER database and created two cohorts: men with a history of testicular cancer, and a controlled population with melanoma. Melanoma was used, he explains, because it has a significant amount of survivors and has no known association with prostate cancer. After examining both cohorts, Siddiqui says there was an overall increase in prostate cancer in the testicular cancer arm vs the controlled population.

Intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer was defined by a Gleason score of 7 or that greater than or equal to 8.

Additional subanalyses were conducted to identify other common risk factors such as age, radiation exposure, and race.

<<< View more from the 2015 GU Cancer Symposium


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