Dr. Verschraegen on the JAVELIN Solid Tumor Trial in Advanced NSCLC

Claire Verschraegen, MD
Published: Tuesday, Dec 06, 2016



Claire Verschraegen, MD, professor of Medical Oncology, University of Vermont Cancer Center, discusses the results of the JAVELIN Solid Tumor trial during an interview at the IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Vienna, Austria.

JAVELIN Solid Tumor is an ongoing, multicenter phase I study exploring avelumab in multiple solid tumor types. The agent is a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that blocks the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction but leaves PD-L2 signaling intact, which allows antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity to contribute to antitumor activity.

Patients with advanced NSCLC, who had not previously been treated systemically for metastatic or recurrent disease, and who did not have an activating EGFR mutation or ALK rearrangement, and were not preselected for PD-L1 expression, received avelumab 10 mg/kg IV over 1 hour every 2 weeks until progression, unacceptable toxicity, or withdrawal from the trial.

The results showed that first-line avelumab monotherapy demonstrated clinical activity, and the agent was well-tolerated in these patients. A phase III trial comparing avelumab with platinum-doublet in first-line NSCLC is currently in progress, says Verschraegen.

<<< View more from the IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer



Claire Verschraegen, MD, professor of Medical Oncology, University of Vermont Cancer Center, discusses the results of the JAVELIN Solid Tumor trial during an interview at the IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Vienna, Austria.

JAVELIN Solid Tumor is an ongoing, multicenter phase I study exploring avelumab in multiple solid tumor types. The agent is a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that blocks the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction but leaves PD-L2 signaling intact, which allows antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity to contribute to antitumor activity.

Patients with advanced NSCLC, who had not previously been treated systemically for metastatic or recurrent disease, and who did not have an activating EGFR mutation or ALK rearrangement, and were not preselected for PD-L1 expression, received avelumab 10 mg/kg IV over 1 hour every 2 weeks until progression, unacceptable toxicity, or withdrawal from the trial.

The results showed that first-line avelumab monotherapy demonstrated clinical activity, and the agent was well-tolerated in these patients. A phase III trial comparing avelumab with platinum-doublet in first-line NSCLC is currently in progress, says Verschraegen.

<<< View more from the IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer


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Clinical Vignette Series: 34th Annual Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium: Innovative Cancer Therapy for Tomorrow®Feb 28, 20182.0
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