Dr. Cost on Pembrolizumab Plus Axitinib in Patients With RCC

Nicholas G. Cost, MD
Published: Friday, Nov 04, 2016



Nicholas G. Cost, MD, assistant professor, Surgery-Urology, Department of Pediatric Urology/ Urologic Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, discusses a clinical trial exploring pembrolizumab (Keytruda) plus axitinib (Inlyta) in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

A phase II clinical trial will investigate the combination regimen in patients with translocation-type unresectable, metastatic RCC, which is the most common alteration found in younger patients with the disease, Cost explains. This is the first clinical trial exploring such agents in this population. The study will have 3 arms: pembrolizumab monotherapy, axitinib monotherapy, and the 2 drugs combined. It is expected to begin accruing patients within the next few months. 

The use of any agents in this population has never been explored in a clinical trial fashion, Cost explains. There is no known evidence of how to best treat these patients. Checkpoint inhibition has led to excitement in not only the field of RCC, but oncology as a whole. Therefore, the trial is greatly anticipated in the community, Cost says.
 

<<< View more from the 2016 International Kidney Cancer Symposium



Nicholas G. Cost, MD, assistant professor, Surgery-Urology, Department of Pediatric Urology/ Urologic Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, discusses a clinical trial exploring pembrolizumab (Keytruda) plus axitinib (Inlyta) in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

A phase II clinical trial will investigate the combination regimen in patients with translocation-type unresectable, metastatic RCC, which is the most common alteration found in younger patients with the disease, Cost explains. This is the first clinical trial exploring such agents in this population. The study will have 3 arms: pembrolizumab monotherapy, axitinib monotherapy, and the 2 drugs combined. It is expected to begin accruing patients within the next few months. 

The use of any agents in this population has never been explored in a clinical trial fashion, Cost explains. There is no known evidence of how to best treat these patients. Checkpoint inhibition has led to excitement in not only the field of RCC, but oncology as a whole. Therefore, the trial is greatly anticipated in the community, Cost says.
 

<<< View more from the 2016 International Kidney Cancer Symposium


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