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First-Line Patient Selection for CDK Inhibitor Use

Kimberly L. Blackwell, MD, Duke University School of Medicine
Published: Monday, May 22, 2017



Transcript:

Kimberly L. Blackwell, MD:
One of the things that practicing clinicians are thinking about is, are there patients whom I definitely would give a CDK inhibitor to, such as ribociclib? And are there patients I definitely would not?

There has been a fairly extensive analysis of not only the MONALEESA-2 dataset, which was the approval study for ribociclib, but also the other CDK inhibitor trials. And when you look at things that we tend to think of as better prognostics, the CDK inhibitors actually made just as large an impact. For instance, in the bone-only population in the CDK inhibitor trials, there appears to be a very similar benefit to those patients who are facing bone-only disease compared to patients that had known visceral metastases.

I’ve looked at the data. We like to pick things apart. I’m a picker, and I tried to see if I could find a group that I wouldn’t offer the drugs to, but the reality is that I haven’t found a group where there’s a clear absence of benefit. There’s not one group that adding the CDK inhibitor to didn’t make a difference. So, for right now, I’m offering CDK inhibitors to all of my patients in the first-line setting of hormone sensitive metastatic breast cancer.

Transcript Edited for Clarity
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Transcript:

Kimberly L. Blackwell, MD:
One of the things that practicing clinicians are thinking about is, are there patients whom I definitely would give a CDK inhibitor to, such as ribociclib? And are there patients I definitely would not?

There has been a fairly extensive analysis of not only the MONALEESA-2 dataset, which was the approval study for ribociclib, but also the other CDK inhibitor trials. And when you look at things that we tend to think of as better prognostics, the CDK inhibitors actually made just as large an impact. For instance, in the bone-only population in the CDK inhibitor trials, there appears to be a very similar benefit to those patients who are facing bone-only disease compared to patients that had known visceral metastases.

I’ve looked at the data. We like to pick things apart. I’m a picker, and I tried to see if I could find a group that I wouldn’t offer the drugs to, but the reality is that I haven’t found a group where there’s a clear absence of benefit. There’s not one group that adding the CDK inhibitor to didn’t make a difference. So, for right now, I’m offering CDK inhibitors to all of my patients in the first-line setting of hormone sensitive metastatic breast cancer.

Transcript Edited for Clarity
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Clinical Vignette Series: 34th Annual Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium: Innovative Cancer Therapy for Tomorrow®Feb 28, 20182.0
34th Annual Miami Breast Cancer Conference® Clinical Case Vignette Series™May 25, 20182.0
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