Dr. Kris on Dacomitinib in EGFR-Positive Lung Cancer

Mark G. Kris, MD
Published Online: Wednesday, Dec 12, 2012

Mark G. Kris, MD, chief of the Thoracic Oncology Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, discusses the initial trials studying dacomitinib, an irreversible pan-HER tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), in patients with EGFR-mutant lung cancers.

Kris explains that dacomitinib was first studied in hopes that a greater, potentially permanent, tumor shrinkage would occur. A phase II study compared dacomitinib to reversible TKIs such as gefitinib and erlotinib as a first-line treatment for patients with lung cancers. The partial response rate was 74% among patients with EGFR deletions at exons 19 and 21. At one year, progression-free survival (PFS) rate was 77% and median PFS was 17 months.

Dacomitib may be as effective as gefitinib in terms of degree and length of tumor shrinkage, Kris believes.

Mark G. Kris, MD, chief of the Thoracic Oncology Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, discusses the initial trials studying dacomitinib, an irreversible pan-HER tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), in patients with EGFR-mutant lung cancers.

Kris explains that dacomitinib was first studied in hopes that a greater, potentially permanent, tumor shrinkage would occur. A phase II study compared dacomitinib to reversible TKIs such as gefitinib and erlotinib as a first-line treatment for patients with lung cancers. The partial response rate was 74% among patients with EGFR deletions at exons 19 and 21. At one year, progression-free survival (PFS) rate was 77% and median PFS was 17 months.

Dacomitib may be as effective as gefitinib in terms of degree and length of tumor shrinkage, Kris believes.


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