Dr. Chaudhary on Short-Term and Long-Term Future of CAR T-Cells

Preet M. Chaudhary, MD, PhD
Published: Monday, Feb 13, 2017



Preet M. Chaudhary, MD, PhD, chief of the Jane Anne Nohl Division of Hematology and Center for the Study of Blood Diseases, Department of Medicine, professor of Medicine, Ronald H. Bloom Family Chair in Lymphoma Research, and program director of the USC Norris Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, co-leader of the Molecular Genetics Program, University of Southern California, discusses the short-term and long-term future of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells.

The short-term goal of the CAR T-cell products is to achieve regulatory approval and to become available to a wider group of physicians. These products do have toxicities but are desperately needed, explains Chaudhary.

In the long term, due to toxicities, there is a need for researchers to go back and come up with a new design to make it safer for wider communities, explains Chaudhary.
 


Preet M. Chaudhary, MD, PhD, chief of the Jane Anne Nohl Division of Hematology and Center for the Study of Blood Diseases, Department of Medicine, professor of Medicine, Ronald H. Bloom Family Chair in Lymphoma Research, and program director of the USC Norris Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, co-leader of the Molecular Genetics Program, University of Southern California, discusses the short-term and long-term future of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells.

The short-term goal of the CAR T-cell products is to achieve regulatory approval and to become available to a wider group of physicians. These products do have toxicities but are desperately needed, explains Chaudhary.

In the long term, due to toxicities, there is a need for researchers to go back and come up with a new design to make it safer for wider communities, explains Chaudhary.
 

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