Dr. Friedlander on Checkpoint Inhibitors in Second-Line Bladder Cancer Treatment

Terence Friedlander, MD
Published Online: Tuesday, Oct 31, 2017



Terence Friedlander, MD, an assistant clinical professor in the Division of Hematology/Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, discusses checkpoint inhibitors in second-line bladder cancer treatment.

Which checkpoint inhibitor to prescribe depends on physician's choice. The cleanest data are for pembrolizumab (Keytruda) from the KEYNOTE-045 study, because there was an overall survival benefit, and for atezolizumab (Tecentriq).

Nivolumab (Opdivo), avelumab (Bavencio), and durvalumab (Imfinzi) are also reasonable options, explains Friedlander. Until these agents are explored in a head-to-head comparison, none of these inhibitors are favored over the others, says Friedlander.


Terence Friedlander, MD, an assistant clinical professor in the Division of Hematology/Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, discusses checkpoint inhibitors in second-line bladder cancer treatment.

Which checkpoint inhibitor to prescribe depends on physician's choice. The cleanest data are for pembrolizumab (Keytruda) from the KEYNOTE-045 study, because there was an overall survival benefit, and for atezolizumab (Tecentriq).

Nivolumab (Opdivo), avelumab (Bavencio), and durvalumab (Imfinzi) are also reasonable options, explains Friedlander. Until these agents are explored in a head-to-head comparison, none of these inhibitors are favored over the others, says Friedlander.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Clinical Interchange™: Translating Research to Inform Changing Paradigms: Assessment of Emerging Immuno-Oncology Strategies and Combinations across Lung, Head and Neck, and Bladder CancersOct 31, 20182.0
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