Dr. Usmani on Subcutaneous Delivery of Daratumumab in Myeloma

Saad Z. Usmani, MD
Published: Tuesday, Feb 07, 2017



Saad Z. Usmani, MD, Department of Hematologic Oncology and Blood Disorders, Levine Cancer Institute/Carolinas HealthCare System, discusses administering daratumumab (Darzalex) in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.

This was an open-label, multicenter, dose-escalation phase Ib study to assess the subcutaneous delivery of daratumumab.

Intravenous infusion of daratumumab can take up to 8 hours, which is an inconvenience for many patients. In this study, subcutaneous delivery was tested as an attempt to cut down time spent administering the therapy.

Both the 1200 mg and 800 mg fixed doses were found to be tolerable, Usmani explains.
 


Saad Z. Usmani, MD, Department of Hematologic Oncology and Blood Disorders, Levine Cancer Institute/Carolinas HealthCare System, discusses administering daratumumab (Darzalex) in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.

This was an open-label, multicenter, dose-escalation phase Ib study to assess the subcutaneous delivery of daratumumab.

Intravenous infusion of daratumumab can take up to 8 hours, which is an inconvenience for many patients. In this study, subcutaneous delivery was tested as an attempt to cut down time spent administering the therapy.

Both the 1200 mg and 800 mg fixed doses were found to be tolerable, Usmani explains.
 

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Oncology Best Practice™: Choosing Therapies for Patients with EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancers: More Options... More Decisions... Better OutcomesFeb 28, 20182.0
Clinical Vignette Series: 34th Annual Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium: Innovative Cancer Therapy for Tomorrow®Feb 28, 20182.0
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x