Dr. Young Discusses Using Anticoagulants in Children With Cancer

Guy Young, MD
Published Online: Tuesday, Oct 17, 2017



Guy Young, MD, director, Hemostasis and Thrombosis Program, attending physician, Hematology, Oncology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, USC, discusses using anticoagulants in children with cancer.

Using anticoagulants in children with cancer is complicated, partly because of the increased risk of bleeding in this population, much attributed to the nature of childhood—playing sports, going to the park, or riding a bike, says Young.

Additionally, anticoagulants such as warfarin come with their own adverse events.


Guy Young, MD, director, Hemostasis and Thrombosis Program, attending physician, Hematology, Oncology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, USC, discusses using anticoagulants in children with cancer.

Using anticoagulants in children with cancer is complicated, partly because of the increased risk of bleeding in this population, much attributed to the nature of childhood—playing sports, going to the park, or riding a bike, says Young.

Additionally, anticoagulants such as warfarin come with their own adverse events.

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