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Future of Ovarian and Cervical Cancers

Panelists:Robert L. Coleman, MD, MD Anderson Cancer Center; Thomas Herzog, MD, University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute; Bradley J. Monk, MD, University of Arizona Cancer Center; Angeles Alvarez Secord, MD, Duke University School of Medicine; James Tate Thigpen, MD, University of Mississippi School of Medicine
Published Online: Thursday, Oct 01, 2015

 
Among cancers without an available targeted therapy, cervical cancer once had the highest cancer-related mortality rates, says Bradley J. Monk, MD. Survival is now improving, as a result of continued advances in the treatment of patients. Continued advancement is critical in ovarian and cervical cancer to continue to improve survival. Moreover, once developed, it is important to focus on integrating these agents into the standard of care, states Robert L. Coleman, MD.

Inhibitors of PD-L1 and PARP may have a role in future treatment strategies for patients with ovarian cancer, says Thomas Herzog, MD. The first PARP inhibitor, olaparib, was approved for patients with BRCA-positive ovarian cancer in December 2014. Additionally, early phase studies presented at the 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting showed promising response rates for PD-L1 and PD-1-targeted agents.

These agents represent an ever-growing role for precision medicine in gynecologic malignancies. Biomarkers will help identify patients who are most likely to benefit from these agents and improve survival, notes Angeles Alvarez Secord, MD.
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Among cancers without an available targeted therapy, cervical cancer once had the highest cancer-related mortality rates, says Bradley J. Monk, MD. Survival is now improving, as a result of continued advances in the treatment of patients. Continued advancement is critical in ovarian and cervical cancer to continue to improve survival. Moreover, once developed, it is important to focus on integrating these agents into the standard of care, states Robert L. Coleman, MD.

Inhibitors of PD-L1 and PARP may have a role in future treatment strategies for patients with ovarian cancer, says Thomas Herzog, MD. The first PARP inhibitor, olaparib, was approved for patients with BRCA-positive ovarian cancer in December 2014. Additionally, early phase studies presented at the 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting showed promising response rates for PD-L1 and PD-1-targeted agents.

These agents represent an ever-growing role for precision medicine in gynecologic malignancies. Biomarkers will help identify patients who are most likely to benefit from these agents and improve survival, notes Angeles Alvarez Secord, MD.
View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Medical Crossfire<sup>®</sup>: The Expanding Role of PARP Inhibitors in the Treatment of Ovarian Cancers – Current Strategies and Future DirectionJan 30, 20181.5
Clinical Vignette Series: 34th Annual Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium: Innovative Cancer Therapy for Tomorrow®Feb 28, 20182.0
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