Dr. Kris on the Use of Genetic Testing in Lung Cancer

Mark G. Kris, MD
Published: Monday, Jun 06, 2011

Mark G. Kris, MD, Thoracic Oncology Service from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center describes the use of genetic testing in lung cancer.

Dr. Kris says doctors have long known that despite a person having a diagnosis of a certain cancer, what happens to that person and their response to therapy varies quite a bit, and there has never been a good explanation as to why. In the last ten years, doctors have learned that, at least in lung cancer, the cancer cells are driven by genetic changes and mutations. When a specific mutation is discovered, it defines different groups of patients and gives the physician an idea of what therapy might be best.
Mark G. Kris, MD, Thoracic Oncology Service from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center describes the use of genetic testing in lung cancer.

Dr. Kris says doctors have long known that despite a person having a diagnosis of a certain cancer, what happens to that person and their response to therapy varies quite a bit, and there has never been a good explanation as to why. In the last ten years, doctors have learned that, at least in lung cancer, the cancer cells are driven by genetic changes and mutations. When a specific mutation is discovered, it defines different groups of patients and gives the physician an idea of what therapy might be best.

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Oncology Briefings™: Updates in Novel Therapeutic Options for Lung Neuroendocrine TumorsMay 31, 20181.0
Community Practice Connections™: Working Group to Optimize Outcomes in EGFR-mutated Lung Cancers: Evolving Concepts for Nurses to Facilitate and Improve Patient CareJun 30, 20181.5
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