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Dr. Brufsky on Anastrozole Versus Tamoxifen in DCIS

Adam M. Brufsky, MD, PhD
Published: Wednesday, Jun 03, 2015



Adam M. Brufsky, MD, PhD, professor of Medicine, associate chief, Division of Hematology/Oncology, co-director, Comprehensive Breast Cancer Center, associate director, Clinical Investigation, University of Pittsburgh, compares the use of anastrozole to tamoxifen in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

In a recent study, anastrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, was seen as superior to tamoxifen for the treatment of DCIS. According to prior research, surgical resection of DCIS followed by radiation therapy created a substantial reduction in recurrent DCIS and new cancers. Tamoxifen, Brufsky explains, has demonstrated similar findings. 

Anastrozole had previously been tested as more effective than tamoxifen in invasive cancers. In this study, researchers found that it also decreases recurrence in DCIS by 30-40%, as well as cancers in the opposite breast by another 30-40%. Anastrozole also has less toxicity, Brufsky says, as well as no risk of uterine cancer, and a minimal risk of blood clots.

These findings will likely have a clinical practice, Brusky adds.

<<< View more from the 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting



Adam M. Brufsky, MD, PhD, professor of Medicine, associate chief, Division of Hematology/Oncology, co-director, Comprehensive Breast Cancer Center, associate director, Clinical Investigation, University of Pittsburgh, compares the use of anastrozole to tamoxifen in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

In a recent study, anastrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, was seen as superior to tamoxifen for the treatment of DCIS. According to prior research, surgical resection of DCIS followed by radiation therapy created a substantial reduction in recurrent DCIS and new cancers. Tamoxifen, Brufsky explains, has demonstrated similar findings. 

Anastrozole had previously been tested as more effective than tamoxifen in invasive cancers. In this study, researchers found that it also decreases recurrence in DCIS by 30-40%, as well as cancers in the opposite breast by another 30-40%. Anastrozole also has less toxicity, Brufsky says, as well as no risk of uterine cancer, and a minimal risk of blood clots.

These findings will likely have a clinical practice, Brusky adds.

<<< View more from the 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting




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