Dr. Reck Discusses Prognostic and Predictive Factors for OS With Necitumumab in NSCLC

Martin Reck, MD, PhD
Published: Monday, Jun 01, 2015



Martin Reck, MD, PhD, Head of Thoracic Oncology, Hospital Grosshansdorf, discusses the maximum severity score (MSS) of baseline patient-reported Lung Cancer Symptom Scale (LCSS) as a prognostic and predictive factor for overall survival (OS) for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with necitumumab in the phase III SQUIRE study.

The randomized phase III study examined the addition of necitumumab to gemcitabine-cisplatin in patients with stage IV squamous NSCLC. Data showed a significance increase in progression-free survival and OS. Researchers also sought to determine if the combination had an impact on quality of life, symptoms, and if symptoms would affect the drug's efficacy. This was conducted using the LCSS.

Reck says the study showed that there was a correlation with patient prognosis, explaining that patients who are symptomatic have a poorer prognosis. Researchers also used the MSS to determine if there was a correlation between treatment and the severity of patient symptoms. The best therapeutic impact was seen in patients with a worse symptomatic presentation and the highest severity at baseline, he adds.

<<< View more from the 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting



Martin Reck, MD, PhD, Head of Thoracic Oncology, Hospital Grosshansdorf, discusses the maximum severity score (MSS) of baseline patient-reported Lung Cancer Symptom Scale (LCSS) as a prognostic and predictive factor for overall survival (OS) for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with necitumumab in the phase III SQUIRE study.

The randomized phase III study examined the addition of necitumumab to gemcitabine-cisplatin in patients with stage IV squamous NSCLC. Data showed a significance increase in progression-free survival and OS. Researchers also sought to determine if the combination had an impact on quality of life, symptoms, and if symptoms would affect the drug's efficacy. This was conducted using the LCSS.

Reck says the study showed that there was a correlation with patient prognosis, explaining that patients who are symptomatic have a poorer prognosis. Researchers also used the MSS to determine if there was a correlation between treatment and the severity of patient symptoms. The best therapeutic impact was seen in patients with a worse symptomatic presentation and the highest severity at baseline, he adds.

<<< View more from the 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting


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