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Dr. Eytan Stein Discusses the IDH2 Inhibitor AG-221 in AML

Eytan Stein, MD
Published: Sunday, Dec 07, 2014



Eytan Stein, MD, attending physician in the leukemia service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses new data from a phase I study exploring the oral IDH2 inhibitor AG-221 in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies, primarily acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome.

At the time of the data cut-off, 45 patients with IDH2 mutations were analyzed for response. Overall, by investigator-accessed criteria, 56% of patients responded to therapy, Stein explained.

Responses were comprised of complete remissions (CR; n = 6), CR with incomplete platelet recovery (n = 4), marrow CR (n = 4), CR with incomplete hematologic recovery (n = 1), and partial remissions (n = 10). Responses were durable and lasted for 3 months or longer in the majority of patients.

These findings were from an interim analysis of a phase I trial, Stein emphasized. However, if these results are confirmed in larger trials, it could represent a quantum leap over previous treatments for patients with AML that could potentially lead to durable remissions.

<<< View more from the 2014 ASH Annual Meeting



Eytan Stein, MD, attending physician in the leukemia service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses new data from a phase I study exploring the oral IDH2 inhibitor AG-221 in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies, primarily acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome.

At the time of the data cut-off, 45 patients with IDH2 mutations were analyzed for response. Overall, by investigator-accessed criteria, 56% of patients responded to therapy, Stein explained.

Responses were comprised of complete remissions (CR; n = 6), CR with incomplete platelet recovery (n = 4), marrow CR (n = 4), CR with incomplete hematologic recovery (n = 1), and partial remissions (n = 10). Responses were durable and lasted for 3 months or longer in the majority of patients.

These findings were from an interim analysis of a phase I trial, Stein emphasized. However, if these results are confirmed in larger trials, it could represent a quantum leap over previous treatments for patients with AML that could potentially lead to durable remissions.

<<< View more from the 2014 ASH Annual Meeting




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