Dr. Brawer on Clinical Utility of CCP Test in Prostate Cancer

Michael Brawer, MD
Published: Sunday, May 17, 2015



Michael Brawer, MD, vice president of Medical Affairs, Myriad Genetic Laboratories, discusses the clinical utility of the cell cycle progression (CCP) test in personalizing prostate cancer treatment.

Brawer discusses a study which aimed to answer how practitioners would treat patients prior to and after receiving their Prolaris test results, as well as after discussing the results with patients. The analysis examined 1200 men with prostate cancer in 30 states; 130 clinicians participated who were experienced with administering the Prolaris test. In 48% of cases enrolled in the study, it was demonstrated that treatment management changed after receiving Prolaris test results. Nearly 75% of changes were a reduction in the intensity of therapy, he explains.

For example, a practitioner may have been planning to treat a patient with a radical prostatecomy, but discovers that their Prolaris test results are lower than expected. Therefore, the patient is able to go on active surveillance, Brawer says.

This study shows that a percentage of clinicians used the Prolaris test results to make changes in a patient's treatment plan.

<<< View more from the 2015 AUA Annual Meeting



Michael Brawer, MD, vice president of Medical Affairs, Myriad Genetic Laboratories, discusses the clinical utility of the cell cycle progression (CCP) test in personalizing prostate cancer treatment.

Brawer discusses a study which aimed to answer how practitioners would treat patients prior to and after receiving their Prolaris test results, as well as after discussing the results with patients. The analysis examined 1200 men with prostate cancer in 30 states; 130 clinicians participated who were experienced with administering the Prolaris test. In 48% of cases enrolled in the study, it was demonstrated that treatment management changed after receiving Prolaris test results. Nearly 75% of changes were a reduction in the intensity of therapy, he explains.

For example, a practitioner may have been planning to treat a patient with a radical prostatecomy, but discovers that their Prolaris test results are lower than expected. Therefore, the patient is able to go on active surveillance, Brawer says.

This study shows that a percentage of clinicians used the Prolaris test results to make changes in a patient's treatment plan.

<<< View more from the 2015 AUA Annual Meeting


View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: Personalized Sequencing in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Bridging the Latest Evidence to the Bedside in Clinical ManagementAug 25, 20181.5
Community Practice Connections™: Precision Medicine for Community Oncologists: Assessing the Role of Tumor-Testing Technologies in Cancer CareNov 30, 20181.0
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