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Dr. Kunz on the CLARINET Study for GEP-NETs

Pamela L. Kunz, MD
Published: Tuesday, Jan 26, 2016



Pamela L. Kunz, MD, assistant professor, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, discusses tumor response in the CLARINET study, which examined lanreotide depot versus placebo in patients with metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs).

The study randomized patients to lanreotide, administered monthly as a deep subcutaneous injection, or placebo. The primary endpoint of the trial was progression-free survival (PFS), and the median PFS has not yet been reached in the lanreotide arm versus 18 months in the placebo arm.

This was examined in a select population that was not progressing prior to enrollment. Because of this, Kunz adds that it might be appropriate to not treat a subset of these patients. However, since there is a PFS improvement with lanreotide, the agent can now considered a standard therapy for progressors and nonprogressors. Furthermore, since lanreotide and octreotide have similar mechanisms of action, Kunz says that the two agents can probably be used interchangeably.

<<< View more from the 2016 GI Cancer Symposium



Pamela L. Kunz, MD, assistant professor, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, discusses tumor response in the CLARINET study, which examined lanreotide depot versus placebo in patients with metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs).

The study randomized patients to lanreotide, administered monthly as a deep subcutaneous injection, or placebo. The primary endpoint of the trial was progression-free survival (PFS), and the median PFS has not yet been reached in the lanreotide arm versus 18 months in the placebo arm.

This was examined in a select population that was not progressing prior to enrollment. Because of this, Kunz adds that it might be appropriate to not treat a subset of these patients. However, since there is a PFS improvement with lanreotide, the agent can now considered a standard therapy for progressors and nonprogressors. Furthermore, since lanreotide and octreotide have similar mechanisms of action, Kunz says that the two agents can probably be used interchangeably.

<<< View more from the 2016 GI Cancer Symposium


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