Dr. Overman Discusses Updated Findings of CheckMate-142 in Patients With MSI-H mCRC

Michael J. Overman, MD
Published: Thursday, Jan 19, 2017


Michael J. Overman, MD, medical oncologist, Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses updated results from the CheckMate-142 trial, which investigated nivolumab (Opdivo) alone or in combination with ipilimumab (Yervoy) in patients with DNA mismatch repair deficient/microsatellite instability high (MSI-H) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).
 
The updated findings, which reflect further duration of patient evaluation, support the early findings of the study, Overman says. The findings showed a high stable disease response rate in patients treated in the study, with two-thirds of the patients demonstrating clinical benefit. Overman explains that more than 80% of patients who responded to the treatment are still on therapy and maintaining the benefits.
 
This data is very exciting for the field, Overman says, as the responses seem to be very durable.
 
The updated results also included data on the relevant clinical factors in biomarkers. The results showed that responses to treatment were irrespective of PD-L1 expression, BRAF mutation, and clinical history of Lynch syndrome.

<<< View more from the 2017 GI Cancers Symposium

Michael J. Overman, MD, medical oncologist, Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses updated results from the CheckMate-142 trial, which investigated nivolumab (Opdivo) alone or in combination with ipilimumab (Yervoy) in patients with DNA mismatch repair deficient/microsatellite instability high (MSI-H) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).
 
The updated findings, which reflect further duration of patient evaluation, support the early findings of the study, Overman says. The findings showed a high stable disease response rate in patients treated in the study, with two-thirds of the patients demonstrating clinical benefit. Overman explains that more than 80% of patients who responded to the treatment are still on therapy and maintaining the benefits.
 
This data is very exciting for the field, Overman says, as the responses seem to be very durable.
 
The updated results also included data on the relevant clinical factors in biomarkers. The results showed that responses to treatment were irrespective of PD-L1 expression, BRAF mutation, and clinical history of Lynch syndrome.

<<< View more from the 2017 GI Cancers Symposium

View Conference Coverage
OncLive SAP
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Cancer Summaries and Commentaries™: Update from Chicago: Advances in the Treatment of Breast CancerJul 31, 20181.0
Community Practice Connections™: The Next Generation in Renal Cell Carcinoma Treatment: An Oncology Nursing Essentials WorkshopJul 31, 20181.5
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
External Resources

MJH Associates
American Journal of Managed Care
Cure
MD Magazine
Oncology Nursing News
Pharmacy Times
Physicians' Education Resource
Physician's Money Digest
Specialty Pharmacy Times
TargetedOnc
OncLive Resources

Articles
Blogs
Conference Coverage
OncLive TV
Peer Exchange
Publications
Specialties
Web Exclusives


About Us
Advertise
Advisory Board
Careers
Contact Us
Forgot Password
Press Releases
Privacy Policy
Terms & Conditions
 
Intellisphere, LLC
2 Clarke Drive
Suite 100
Cranbury, NJ 08512
P: 609-716-7777
F: 609-939-0221

Copyright OncLive 2006-2018
Intellisphere, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
 
x