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Dr. Catenacci on Results of Margetuximab Plus Pembrolizumab in Gastric/GEJ Cancer

Daniel Catenacci, MD
Published: Friday, Jan 19, 2018



Daniel Catenacci, MD, medical oncologist, assistant professor of medicine, Univeristy of Chicago Medicine, discusses margetuximab (MGAH22-10) plus pembrolizumab (Keytruda) as treatment for patients with advanced HER2-positive gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) or gastric adenocarcinoma during the 2018 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium.

In a phase Ib/II study of margetuximab plus pembrolizumab, investigators sought to achieve greater antitumor activity through combining an anti-HER2 antibody with a T-cell checkpoint inhibitor. Preclinical data suggest that the engagement of these agents may results in higher antitumor activity than either agent alone.

Overall, the response rate in all comers was reasonable and impressive, says Catenacci. Patients who were not HER2-amplified did not respond, while all those who had detectable HER2-amplification in the blood responded, Catenacci adds.

Additionally, patients who were highly amplified at the time of initial diagnosis and patients with gastric cancer had the highest response rates. The trial will now expand to another 25 patients who reflect these factors.

<<< View more from the 2018 GI Cancer Symposium


Daniel Catenacci, MD, medical oncologist, assistant professor of medicine, Univeristy of Chicago Medicine, discusses margetuximab (MGAH22-10) plus pembrolizumab (Keytruda) as treatment for patients with advanced HER2-positive gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) or gastric adenocarcinoma during the 2018 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium.

In a phase Ib/II study of margetuximab plus pembrolizumab, investigators sought to achieve greater antitumor activity through combining an anti-HER2 antibody with a T-cell checkpoint inhibitor. Preclinical data suggest that the engagement of these agents may results in higher antitumor activity than either agent alone.

Overall, the response rate in all comers was reasonable and impressive, says Catenacci. Patients who were not HER2-amplified did not respond, while all those who had detectable HER2-amplification in the blood responded, Catenacci adds.

Additionally, patients who were highly amplified at the time of initial diagnosis and patients with gastric cancer had the highest response rates. The trial will now expand to another 25 patients who reflect these factors.

<<< View more from the 2018 GI Cancer Symposium

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