Dr. Roth on the Rationale Behind a Novel Risk-Prediction Model in Lung Cancer Screening

Joshua Roth, PhD
Published: Monday, Dec 05, 2016



Joshua Roth, PhD, assistant member, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, discusses the rationale behind the development of a novel risk-prediction algorithm in the context of screening patients for lung cancer. He discussed this during an interview at the IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Vienna, Austria.

Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening has been shown to increase detection of cases at an early stage and reduce lung cancer mortality, in comparison with X-ray or no screening at all. However, the benefits associated with such screening are reduced in patients who are considered to be poor candidates for curative intent surgery in the event of screen-detected, early-stage disease.

The rationale, says Roth, is to encourage shared decision-making between physicians and patients when the latter must undergo screening for lung cancer. The conversation should cover both potential benefits and harms associated with screening, such as false positives, or the adverse side effects of radiation. The main benefit lies in possible early detection of a tumor, according to Roth, which is then followed by early intervention with either surgery or radiation therapy.



Joshua Roth, PhD, assistant member, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, discusses the rationale behind the development of a novel risk-prediction algorithm in the context of screening patients for lung cancer. He discussed this during an interview at the IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Vienna, Austria.

Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening has been shown to increase detection of cases at an early stage and reduce lung cancer mortality, in comparison with X-ray or no screening at all. However, the benefits associated with such screening are reduced in patients who are considered to be poor candidates for curative intent surgery in the event of screen-detected, early-stage disease.

The rationale, says Roth, is to encourage shared decision-making between physicians and patients when the latter must undergo screening for lung cancer. The conversation should cover both potential benefits and harms associated with screening, such as false positives, or the adverse side effects of radiation. The main benefit lies in possible early detection of a tumor, according to Roth, which is then followed by early intervention with either surgery or radiation therapy.


View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: 18th Annual International Lung Cancer Congress®Oct 31, 20181.5
Clinical Interchange™: Translating Research to Inform Changing Paradigms: Assessment of Emerging Immuno-Oncology Strategies and Combinations across Lung, Head and Neck, and Bladder CancersOct 31, 20182.0
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