Dr. Yao on the Milan Criteria in Liver Cancer

Francis Yao, MD
Published: Sunday, Sep 11, 2016



Francis Yao, MD, professor of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, medical director of the Liver Transplant Program at UCSF Medical Center, discusses the Milan criteria in liver cancer.

In the past, oncologists tended to transplant bulky tumors and would often see their patients' disease recur, says Yao. The Milan criteria, which were published in 1996, state that a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is selected for transplantation when he or she has a single lesion up to 5 centimeters, or 2 to 3 lesions up to 3 centimeters.

After the Milan criteria became a benchmark for the treatment of patients with HCC, some oncologists began to question whether the size or number of lesions could be expanded. Research suggested that patients with tumor sizes just beyond the Milan criteria may see very positive outcomes, according to Yao. UCSF proposed an updated set of criteria, which expanded the upper limit of the tumor size by 1.5 centimeters, or up to 3 nodules with the largest lesion up to 4.5 centimeters.

<<< View more from the 2016 International Liver Cancer Association Annual Conference



Francis Yao, MD, professor of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, medical director of the Liver Transplant Program at UCSF Medical Center, discusses the Milan criteria in liver cancer.

In the past, oncologists tended to transplant bulky tumors and would often see their patients' disease recur, says Yao. The Milan criteria, which were published in 1996, state that a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is selected for transplantation when he or she has a single lesion up to 5 centimeters, or 2 to 3 lesions up to 3 centimeters.

After the Milan criteria became a benchmark for the treatment of patients with HCC, some oncologists began to question whether the size or number of lesions could be expanded. Research suggested that patients with tumor sizes just beyond the Milan criteria may see very positive outcomes, according to Yao. UCSF proposed an updated set of criteria, which expanded the upper limit of the tumor size by 1.5 centimeters, or up to 3 nodules with the largest lesion up to 4.5 centimeters.

<<< View more from the 2016 International Liver Cancer Association Annual Conference


View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
34th Annual Miami Breast Cancer Conference® Clinical Case Vignette Series™May 25, 20182.0
Community Practice Connections™: CDK4/6 Inhibitors With the Experts: The Role of Emerging Agents for the Management of Metastatic Breast CancerMay 30, 20182.0
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x