Dr. Muss on AIs With or Without mTOR Blockade

Hyman B. Muss, MD
Published: Thursday, Mar 06, 2014

Hyman B. Muss, MD, professor of oncology, University of North Carolina, director, Geriatric Oncology, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses optimizing the administration of endocrine therapies with or without mTOR inhibitors for patients with HR-positive metastatic breast cancer.

Muss says the talk, which he will give on Saturday at the Miami Breast Cancer Conference, will focus on the available therapies for patients with HR-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. The talk will also cover current therapies as well as data on new treatment strategies with mTOR inhibitors and aromatase inhibitors.

Exemestane, an aromatase inhibitor, has proven to be a major advance in patients with metastatic disease, Muss says. This agent can extend the time of disease control substantially with some risk of toxicities. Muss says this agent shows that the marriage of biologic agents and traditional endocrine therapy can work together for possibly much better outcomes.

Muss believes that some of this data has prompted pharmaceutical companies to develop new compounds and to look at models of enhancing endocrine therapy with biologic agents.

<<< View more from the 2014 Miami Breast Cancer Conference

Hyman B. Muss, MD, professor of oncology, University of North Carolina, director, Geriatric Oncology, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses optimizing the administration of endocrine therapies with or without mTOR inhibitors for patients with HR-positive metastatic breast cancer.

Muss says the talk, which he will give on Saturday at the Miami Breast Cancer Conference, will focus on the available therapies for patients with HR-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. The talk will also cover current therapies as well as data on new treatment strategies with mTOR inhibitors and aromatase inhibitors.

Exemestane, an aromatase inhibitor, has proven to be a major advance in patients with metastatic disease, Muss says. This agent can extend the time of disease control substantially with some risk of toxicities. Muss says this agent shows that the marriage of biologic agents and traditional endocrine therapy can work together for possibly much better outcomes.

Muss believes that some of this data has prompted pharmaceutical companies to develop new compounds and to look at models of enhancing endocrine therapy with biologic agents.

<<< View more from the 2014 Miami Breast Cancer Conference




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