Dr. Brufsky Discusses the tnAcity Trial in TNBC

Adam M. Brufsky, MD, PhD
Published: Friday, Dec 13, 2013



Adam Brufsky, MD, PhD, FACP, professor of medicine, associate division chief, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, discusses the tnAcity trial, which is aimed to clarify how best to use existing drugs in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC).

Brufsky says the idea of the tnAcity trial is that while most physicians use gemcitabine and carboplatin, there is not much evidence to support that that is the optimal form of treatment. This trial will measure the efficacy of combinations, such as gemcitabine and carboplatin, carboplatin and nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane), and gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel. The phase II trial, which has about 80 patients enrolled, will randomize the patients to receive one of the three combinations.

Based on the results of the phase II trial, Brufsky says, the two combinations that prove to be the most effective will be tested. The phase III portion will begin in about a year. Brufsky says the trial will answer a very important question while also investigating biomarkers that will help physicians figure out how to optimally treat patients with TNBC.

<<< View more from the 2013 SABCS Meeting



Adam Brufsky, MD, PhD, FACP, professor of medicine, associate division chief, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, discusses the tnAcity trial, which is aimed to clarify how best to use existing drugs in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC).

Brufsky says the idea of the tnAcity trial is that while most physicians use gemcitabine and carboplatin, there is not much evidence to support that that is the optimal form of treatment. This trial will measure the efficacy of combinations, such as gemcitabine and carboplatin, carboplatin and nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane), and gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel. The phase II trial, which has about 80 patients enrolled, will randomize the patients to receive one of the three combinations.

Based on the results of the phase II trial, Brufsky says, the two combinations that prove to be the most effective will be tested. The phase III portion will begin in about a year. Brufsky says the trial will answer a very important question while also investigating biomarkers that will help physicians figure out how to optimally treat patients with TNBC.

<<< View more from the 2013 SABCS Meeting


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