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Dr. Reardon Discusses Rindopepimut Plus Bevacizumab in Glioblastoma

David Reardon, MD
Published: Saturday, Nov 15, 2014



David Reardon, MD, clinical director, Center for Neuro-Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, president, Society for Neuro-Oncology, discusses the ReACT study, which examined rindopepimut (CDX-110) plus bevacizumab in patients with relapsed glioblastoma.

The phase II randomized controlled study had two arms, explains Reardon. The first arm enrolled patients that were naïve to bevacizumab but had progressive, recurring glioblastoma while the second arm enrolled patients who had received previous bevacizumab and had progressive disease.

Patients in the first arm of the study were randomized to receive bevacizumab plus rindopepimut, an EGFRvIII synthetic peptide vaccine, or bevacizumab plus a placebo, Reardon says. The second arm received bevacizumab plus open-label rindopepimut. 

The study showed that the vaccine was well tolerated and elicited a “surprising degree” of immunoactivity, Reardon says. Radiographic responses favored the vaccine arm and results also showed benefits associated with the primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS), which were statistically significance in the rindopepimut arm. There was also a significant increase in median overall survival that was associated with the vaccine, Reardon says.

In terms of durable response, those enrolled on the rindopepimut arm have experienced a durable benefit. Reardon also mentions that those who had higher levels of antibody production demonstrated better survival. This may be a potential biomarker to predict which patients will benefit from this novel vaccine, Reardon notes.

<<< View more from the 2014 Society for Neuro-Oncology Annual Meeting



David Reardon, MD, clinical director, Center for Neuro-Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, president, Society for Neuro-Oncology, discusses the ReACT study, which examined rindopepimut (CDX-110) plus bevacizumab in patients with relapsed glioblastoma.

The phase II randomized controlled study had two arms, explains Reardon. The first arm enrolled patients that were naïve to bevacizumab but had progressive, recurring glioblastoma while the second arm enrolled patients who had received previous bevacizumab and had progressive disease.

Patients in the first arm of the study were randomized to receive bevacizumab plus rindopepimut, an EGFRvIII synthetic peptide vaccine, or bevacizumab plus a placebo, Reardon says. The second arm received bevacizumab plus open-label rindopepimut. 

The study showed that the vaccine was well tolerated and elicited a “surprising degree” of immunoactivity, Reardon says. Radiographic responses favored the vaccine arm and results also showed benefits associated with the primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS), which were statistically significance in the rindopepimut arm. There was also a significant increase in median overall survival that was associated with the vaccine, Reardon says.

In terms of durable response, those enrolled on the rindopepimut arm have experienced a durable benefit. Reardon also mentions that those who had higher levels of antibody production demonstrated better survival. This may be a potential biomarker to predict which patients will benefit from this novel vaccine, Reardon notes.

<<< View more from the 2014 Society for Neuro-Oncology Annual Meeting




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