Dr. Mrugala on Extending Treatment With Temozolomide in Glioblastoma

Maciej M. Mrugala, MD, PhD
Published: Saturday, Nov 21, 2015

Maciej M. Mrugala, MD, PhD, chief, Division of Neuro-Oncology, University of Washington, discusses a retrospective analysis looking at adding cycles of treatment with temozolomide in newly diagnosed patients with glioblastoma. These findings were reported on at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuro-Oncology.

Though data from a previous study suggested that temozolomide be given for 6 cycles, the optimal dosing schedule is not completely clear, Mrugala says. Further, given the favorable safety profile of this drug, many oncologists are extending treatment past 6 cycles. The retrospective analysis in which Mrugala was involved with essentially sought to answer the question, “How much temozolomide is too much?”

In this analysis, patients were divided into three subgroups: those who received fewer than 6 cycles, those who received exactly 6 cycles, and those who received more than 6 cycles of temozolomide. The group that received more than 6 cycles had better survival, Mrugala says.

Though the study is retrospective and thus not perfect, Mrugala says, it still provides some insight into the appropriate dosing schedule for this agent.

<<< View more from the 2015 SNO Meeting

Maciej M. Mrugala, MD, PhD, chief, Division of Neuro-Oncology, University of Washington, discusses a retrospective analysis looking at adding cycles of treatment with temozolomide in newly diagnosed patients with glioblastoma. These findings were reported on at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuro-Oncology.

Though data from a previous study suggested that temozolomide be given for 6 cycles, the optimal dosing schedule is not completely clear, Mrugala says. Further, given the favorable safety profile of this drug, many oncologists are extending treatment past 6 cycles. The retrospective analysis in which Mrugala was involved with essentially sought to answer the question, “How much temozolomide is too much?”

In this analysis, patients were divided into three subgroups: those who received fewer than 6 cycles, those who received exactly 6 cycles, and those who received more than 6 cycles of temozolomide. The group that received more than 6 cycles had better survival, Mrugala says.

Though the study is retrospective and thus not perfect, Mrugala says, it still provides some insight into the appropriate dosing schedule for this agent.

<<< View more from the 2015 SNO Meeting




View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x