Dr. Champlin on the Role of EASIX Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

Richard E. Champlin, MD
Published: Friday, Feb 22, 2019



Richard E. Champlin, a professor of medicine at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses the association reported between the Endothelial Activation and Stress Index (EASIX) and fluid overload and survival in patients who underwent allogenic stem cell transplantation (SCT).

Grade ≥2 fluid overload has been determined to be a significant adverse event with nonrelapse mortality in patients with allogenic SCT, and researchers hypothesized that endothelial damage to prior treatments before receiving allogenic SCT can be associated with this type of toxicity. In the study, predictors of ≥2 fluid overload and 6-month overall survival were evaluated, as well as EASIX scores.   

Findings showed that an elevated EASIX index can identify a group of patients who are at high risk for treatment-related mortality, Champlin explains. By identifying these patients, physicians can introduce interventions that can reduce fluid and improve capillary gut syndrome. There are agents available that could reduce fluid overload appropriately in this high-risk group, he concludes.

<<< 2019 Transplantation and Cellular Therapy Meetings


Richard E. Champlin, a professor of medicine at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses the association reported between the Endothelial Activation and Stress Index (EASIX) and fluid overload and survival in patients who underwent allogenic stem cell transplantation (SCT).

Grade ≥2 fluid overload has been determined to be a significant adverse event with nonrelapse mortality in patients with allogenic SCT, and researchers hypothesized that endothelial damage to prior treatments before receiving allogenic SCT can be associated with this type of toxicity. In the study, predictors of ≥2 fluid overload and 6-month overall survival were evaluated, as well as EASIX scores.   

Findings showed that an elevated EASIX index can identify a group of patients who are at high risk for treatment-related mortality, Champlin explains. By identifying these patients, physicians can introduce interventions that can reduce fluid and improve capillary gut syndrome. There are agents available that could reduce fluid overload appropriately in this high-risk group, he concludes.

<<< 2019 Transplantation and Cellular Therapy Meetings



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