Browse by Series:

Targeted Therapy for KRAS p.G12C NSCLC

Insights From: Mark Kris, MD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Published: Friday, Sep 06, 2019



Transcript: 

Mark Kris, MD: One of the largest areas of need in the whole field of thoracic oncology is a specific treatment, a targeted treatment for KRAS-mutated cancers. KRAS-mutated cancers are the most common type of molecular abnormality driver oncogene in all of lung adenocarcinoma and probably in all of lung cancer. We have tried very hard over decades to come up with drugs that can specifically target KRAS as an oncogenic driver but have been unsuccessful. So to have any agent that has the appearance of benefit against KRAS-mutated lung cancer is a huge development.

Also, the most common mutation in KRAS-mutated cancers is the G12C mutation. And this agent, AMG 510, is a drug that specifically targets KRAS-mutated lung cancers that have that G12C mutation. So it targets KRAS, and it targets the specific mutation. I know a lot of people might say it’s a rare mutation and it’s a rare subtype. Well, it’s actually not. There are as many KRAS G12C mutations as there are EGFR mutations and exon 19 mutations, maybe even more. So it’s a very important development.

In recent years, many investigators have developed drugs that target KRAS G12C, and now we are seeing them moving to the clinic, and we are seeing really unexpected and unprecedented benefit. This drug was discussed at the ASCO meeting, the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in June of 2019, and the early results of its success—and frankly lack of significant toxicity—were presented. We are very excited about the presentation of more data about AMG 510, and other specific RAS-targeted drugs that are in development as well. This is a huge development for the field of oncology. It’s a dream come true, actually, for oncologists who have worked in the precision medicine area. And we are so happy to have it there, to have it continue to show good results in testing, and to be able to hear more about it in these upcoming meetings.

Transcript Edited for Clarity
 
SELECTED
LANGUAGE
Slider Left
Slider Right


Transcript: 

Mark Kris, MD: One of the largest areas of need in the whole field of thoracic oncology is a specific treatment, a targeted treatment for KRAS-mutated cancers. KRAS-mutated cancers are the most common type of molecular abnormality driver oncogene in all of lung adenocarcinoma and probably in all of lung cancer. We have tried very hard over decades to come up with drugs that can specifically target KRAS as an oncogenic driver but have been unsuccessful. So to have any agent that has the appearance of benefit against KRAS-mutated lung cancer is a huge development.

Also, the most common mutation in KRAS-mutated cancers is the G12C mutation. And this agent, AMG 510, is a drug that specifically targets KRAS-mutated lung cancers that have that G12C mutation. So it targets KRAS, and it targets the specific mutation. I know a lot of people might say it’s a rare mutation and it’s a rare subtype. Well, it’s actually not. There are as many KRAS G12C mutations as there are EGFR mutations and exon 19 mutations, maybe even more. So it’s a very important development.

In recent years, many investigators have developed drugs that target KRAS G12C, and now we are seeing them moving to the clinic, and we are seeing really unexpected and unprecedented benefit. This drug was discussed at the ASCO meeting, the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in June of 2019, and the early results of its success—and frankly lack of significant toxicity—were presented. We are very excited about the presentation of more data about AMG 510, and other specific RAS-targeted drugs that are in development as well. This is a huge development for the field of oncology. It’s a dream come true, actually, for oncologists who have worked in the precision medicine area. And we are so happy to have it there, to have it continue to show good results in testing, and to be able to hear more about it in these upcoming meetings.

Transcript Edited for Clarity
 
View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: 2nd Annual School of Nursing Oncology™Sep 28, 20191.5
Medical Crossfire®: Experts Weigh-In on Emerging Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors and Combination Strategies for Advanced NSCLCNov 30, 20191.5
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x