Search Videos by Topic or Participant
Browse by Series:

Optimal Dosing of Regorafenib in CRC

Insight From: Cathy Eng, MD, MD Anderson 
Published: Wednesday, Aug 20, 2014
For High-Definition, Click
The FDA approved regorafenib in 2012 for use in patients with metastatic CRC who have been previously treated with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, an anti-VEGF therapy, and, if KRAS wild type, an anti-EGFR therapy. The standard dose for regofenib used in the later-line setting is 160 mg. However, many patients experience toxicities at this dose. In this segment, Cathy Eng, MD, provides practical advice on dosing strategies to help increase the likelihood for success for patients on regorafenib therapy.

Like many of her colleagues, Eng typically starts with a dose of 120 mg of regorafenib; some of her colleagues start as low as 80 mg, she remarks. Because most patients experience early toxicity, within the first 2 months of administration, Eng tends to escalate the dose at first re-staging, as long as the patient tolerates the lower dose.

Eng does not feel that this strategy compromises efficacy. Because the hand-foot skin reaction can be quite challenging for a patient starting therapy with regorafenib, it is important to make sure that the drug is well tolerated before increasing the dose in subsequent cycles of therapy.
Slider Left
Slider Right
For High-Definition, Click
The FDA approved regorafenib in 2012 for use in patients with metastatic CRC who have been previously treated with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, an anti-VEGF therapy, and, if KRAS wild type, an anti-EGFR therapy. The standard dose for regofenib used in the later-line setting is 160 mg. However, many patients experience toxicities at this dose. In this segment, Cathy Eng, MD, provides practical advice on dosing strategies to help increase the likelihood for success for patients on regorafenib therapy.

Like many of her colleagues, Eng typically starts with a dose of 120 mg of regorafenib; some of her colleagues start as low as 80 mg, she remarks. Because most patients experience early toxicity, within the first 2 months of administration, Eng tends to escalate the dose at first re-staging, as long as the patient tolerates the lower dose.

Eng does not feel that this strategy compromises efficacy. Because the hand-foot skin reaction can be quite challenging for a patient starting therapy with regorafenib, it is important to make sure that the drug is well tolerated before increasing the dose in subsequent cycles of therapy.
View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: 18th Annual International Lung Cancer Congress®Oct 31, 20181.5
Provider and Caregiver Connection™: Addressing Patient Concerns While Managing Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and VomitingOct 31, 20182.0
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x