VISIT US IN CHICAGO JUNE 2-4 AT BOOTH 2073!

Search Videos by Topic or Participant
Browse by Series:

Oncology Nurse's Role in Side Effect Management for HNC

Insight From: Ezra Cohen, MD, UCSD; Barbara A. Murphy, MD, Vanderbilt 
Published: Friday, Aug 22, 2014
For High-Definition, Click
The oncology nurse is critical in the treatment of patients receiving cetuximab therapy, says Ezra Cohen, MD. Oncology nurses are integral in the management of toxicities, which impact medication adherence. Toxicities are common, and nurses are the initial service patients reach out to for assistance. If new supportive care treatment should be introduced, it can be implemented right away through the aid of nurses. If preventative measures, such as minimizing sun exposure or initiating topical therapies, can be implemented, the oncology nurse can readily manage toxicities without reducing the dose or interrupting therapy.

Barbara Murphy, MD, adds that nurses have a substantial impact on a patient’s comfort level with their therapy and can help them learn how to respond to and cope with side effects. In Murphy’s clinic, nurses conduct educational sessions with their patients, informing them of what toxicities to expect, how to cope with adverse events, and when to call their healthcare team with a problem. Without nurses facilitating management, patients are often under-informed and do not have a sense of who they should contact with problems, says Murphy, leaving patients ultimately less confident in dealing with the toxicities of their treatment.
Slider Left
Slider Right
For High-Definition, Click
The oncology nurse is critical in the treatment of patients receiving cetuximab therapy, says Ezra Cohen, MD. Oncology nurses are integral in the management of toxicities, which impact medication adherence. Toxicities are common, and nurses are the initial service patients reach out to for assistance. If new supportive care treatment should be introduced, it can be implemented right away through the aid of nurses. If preventative measures, such as minimizing sun exposure or initiating topical therapies, can be implemented, the oncology nurse can readily manage toxicities without reducing the dose or interrupting therapy.

Barbara Murphy, MD, adds that nurses have a substantial impact on a patient’s comfort level with their therapy and can help them learn how to respond to and cope with side effects. In Murphy’s clinic, nurses conduct educational sessions with their patients, informing them of what toxicities to expect, how to cope with adverse events, and when to call their healthcare team with a problem. Without nurses facilitating management, patients are often under-informed and do not have a sense of who they should contact with problems, says Murphy, leaving patients ultimately less confident in dealing with the toxicities of their treatment.
View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Oncology Briefings™: Updates in Pediatric Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease: Integrating Novel Therapeutic Strategies to Overcome Post-Transplant ObstaclesMay 31, 20181.0
Community Practice Connections™: Working Group to Optimize Outcomes in EGFR-mutated Lung Cancers: Evolving Concepts for Nurses to Facilitate and Improve Patient CareJun 30, 20181.5
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x