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Emerging Therapies in Neuroendocrine Tumors (NETs)

Insights From: Matthews H. Kulke, MD, Harvard Medical School; Jonathan R. Strosberg, MD, Moffitt Cancer Center; James C. Yao, MD, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Published: Monday, Jan 18, 2016


Pazopanib is a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor that hinders the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor among other targets. In phase II studies, pazopanib was associated with a response rate of approximately 20% to 30% in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs). The median progression-free survival of 14.4 months suggests that pazopanib is an active agent in this setting, says James C. Yao, MD. Its efficacy is currently being evaluated in carcinoid tumors, states Jonathan R. Strosberg, MD.

Sorafenib, a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is another potentially active agent in pNETs. Similar to what was found with pazopanib, there was more activity observed in the pNET group compared with the carcinoid tumor groups. Additionally, individuals with carcinoid tumors may find sorafenib more difficult to tolerate, and that has led to therapy discontinuations due to adverse events or withdrawal of consent in clinical trials, says Yao.
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Pazopanib is a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor that hinders the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor among other targets. In phase II studies, pazopanib was associated with a response rate of approximately 20% to 30% in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs). The median progression-free survival of 14.4 months suggests that pazopanib is an active agent in this setting, says James C. Yao, MD. Its efficacy is currently being evaluated in carcinoid tumors, states Jonathan R. Strosberg, MD.

Sorafenib, a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is another potentially active agent in pNETs. Similar to what was found with pazopanib, there was more activity observed in the pNET group compared with the carcinoid tumor groups. Additionally, individuals with carcinoid tumors may find sorafenib more difficult to tolerate, and that has led to therapy discontinuations due to adverse events or withdrawal of consent in clinical trials, says Yao.
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