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Carrie Stricker on Barriers to Adopting Triple Therapy

Carrie Stricker, PhD, RN
Published: Thursday, Jul 19, 2012

Carrie Stricker, PhD, RN, Oncology Nurse Practitioner, Abramson Cancer Center, Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania, discusses barriers to starting patients on a combination of a NK1 receptor antagonist with 5-HT3 receptor antagonist plus dexamethasone, which is currently the standard of care for patients receiving highly emetogenic anticancer therapies.

The largest barrier for this therapy has traditionally been costs. In recent years, this has become less of a concern as insurance reimbursement has begun synchronizing with guidelines. The out of pocket costs were the greatest concern for patients until the development of an intravenous formulation of the NK1 receptor antagonist aprepitant.

The intravenous form, known as fosaprepitant, was shown to be equivalent to the three-day oral form, and generally does not require copay for the patient. This new formulation of the NK1 agonist has helped to remove one of largest compliance barriers.

Carrie Stricker, PhD, RN, Oncology Nurse Practitioner, Abramson Cancer Center, Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania, discusses barriers to starting patients on a combination of a NK1 receptor antagonist with 5-HT3 receptor antagonist plus dexamethasone, which is currently the standard of care for patients receiving highly emetogenic anticancer therapies.

The largest barrier for this therapy has traditionally been costs. In recent years, this has become less of a concern as insurance reimbursement has begun synchronizing with guidelines. The out of pocket costs were the greatest concern for patients until the development of an intravenous formulation of the NK1 receptor antagonist aprepitant.

The intravenous form, known as fosaprepitant, was shown to be equivalent to the three-day oral form, and generally does not require copay for the patient. This new formulation of the NK1 agonist has helped to remove one of largest compliance barriers.


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