Dr. Agnelli Discusses Apixaban for Venous Thromboembolism

Giancarlo Agnelli, MD
Published: Monday, Dec 17, 2012

Giancarlo Agnelli, MD, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy, discusses the results of a study comparing the efficacy and safety of two doses of apixaban, an oral factor Xa inhibitor, with placebo for the treatment of venous thromboembolism.

The risk of developing a blood clot within a vein (venous thrombosis) is significantly increased in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy, biologic, and molecular targeted agents. Venous thromboembolism is especially prevalent in patients who are older, immobile, neutropenic, or diagnosed with metastatic disease.

The randomized, double-blind study compared apixaban at doses of 2.5 mg and 5 mg to placebo for 12 months in patients with venous thromboembolism who had completed 6 to 12 months of anticoagulation.

Both doses of apixaban reduced the risk of symptomatic recurrent fatal or non-fatal venous thromboembolism by approximately 80%. Agnelli says that an 80% reduction in risk of venous thromboembolism is a remarkable achievement. Both doses also did not increase the rate of major bleeding, which Agnelli says is extremely reassuring.

Giancarlo Agnelli, MD, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy, discusses the results of a study comparing the efficacy and safety of two doses of apixaban, an oral factor Xa inhibitor, with placebo for the treatment of venous thromboembolism.

The risk of developing a blood clot within a vein (venous thrombosis) is significantly increased in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy, biologic, and molecular targeted agents. Venous thromboembolism is especially prevalent in patients who are older, immobile, neutropenic, or diagnosed with metastatic disease.

The randomized, double-blind study compared apixaban at doses of 2.5 mg and 5 mg to placebo for 12 months in patients with venous thromboembolism who had completed 6 to 12 months of anticoagulation.

Both doses of apixaban reduced the risk of symptomatic recurrent fatal or non-fatal venous thromboembolism by approximately 80%. Agnelli says that an 80% reduction in risk of venous thromboembolism is a remarkable achievement. Both doses also did not increase the rate of major bleeding, which Agnelli says is extremely reassuring.


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