Dr. Al-Niaimi Discusses Cytoreductive Surgery in Ovarian Cancer

Ahmed N. Al-Niaimi, MD
Published: Thursday, Mar 08, 2018



Ahmed N. Al-Niaimi, MD, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, discusses cytoreductive surgery in ovarian cancer.

Reaching optimal cytoreduction is complicated, so collaboration is key reaching that goal, says Al-Niaimi. It is important to achieve cytoreduction in a systematic way, Al-Niaimi explains, as optimal cytoreduction provides the opportunity for a higher survival and cure rate for these patients. This is particularly true when ovarian cancer spreads to the liver, gallbladder, and porta hepatis, Al-Niaimi says. Achieving an optimal cytoreduction in this case with diaphragm surgery is challenging, but can offer a great benefit.

Results from the phase III AGO DESKTOP III/ENGOT ov20 trial, which randomized patients to second-line chemotherapy alone versus cytoreductive surgery followed by chemotherapy, showed that complete resection was achieved in 72.5% of patients who underwent surgery. The median progression-free survival for the surgical arm was 19.6 months compared with 14 months for patients who did not undergo surgery.
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Ahmed N. Al-Niaimi, MD, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, discusses cytoreductive surgery in ovarian cancer.

Reaching optimal cytoreduction is complicated, so collaboration is key reaching that goal, says Al-Niaimi. It is important to achieve cytoreduction in a systematic way, Al-Niaimi explains, as optimal cytoreduction provides the opportunity for a higher survival and cure rate for these patients. This is particularly true when ovarian cancer spreads to the liver, gallbladder, and porta hepatis, Al-Niaimi says. Achieving an optimal cytoreduction in this case with diaphragm surgery is challenging, but can offer a great benefit.

Results from the phase III AGO DESKTOP III/ENGOT ov20 trial, which randomized patients to second-line chemotherapy alone versus cytoreductive surgery followed by chemotherapy, showed that complete resection was achieved in 72.5% of patients who underwent surgery. The median progression-free survival for the surgical arm was 19.6 months compared with 14 months for patients who did not undergo surgery.



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