Dr. Battiste on Biomarkers in Glioblastoma

James Battiste, MD, PhD
Published: Thursday, Mar 19, 2015

James Battiste, MD, PhD, assistant professor at the University of Oklahoma department of neurology and researcher at Stephenson Cancer Center, discusses research in glioblastoma (GBM).

GBM grows as a solid tumor, but can also invade normal brain tissue and migrate through the brain, says Battiste.

Researchers believe cells either migrate or divide, and may not have energy to do both at the same time.  By looking at Ki-67, a biomarker that can identify cells that are actively dividing, researchers can predict which cells may be migrating.These could lead to new understandings of treatment resistance for GBM.

James Battiste, MD, PhD, assistant professor at the University of Oklahoma department of neurology and researcher at Stephenson Cancer Center, discusses research in glioblastoma (GBM).

GBM grows as a solid tumor, but can also invade normal brain tissue and migrate through the brain, says Battiste.

Researchers believe cells either migrate or divide, and may not have energy to do both at the same time.  By looking at Ki-67, a biomarker that can identify cells that are actively dividing, researchers can predict which cells may be migrating.These could lead to new understandings of treatment resistance for GBM.




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