Dr. Berek Discusses the Impact of PARP Inhibitors on Ovarian Cancer

Jonathan S. Berek, MD
Published: Friday, Nov 09, 2018



Jonathan S. Berek, MD, MMS, Laurie Kraus Lacob Professor, Stanford University School of Medicine, director, Stanford Women’s Cancer Center, senior advisor, Stanford Cancer Institute, discusses the impact of PARP inhibitors on the treatment landscape of ovarian cancer.

Recently, PARP inhibitors have caused the biggest shift in the landscape of ovarian cancer, according to Berek. PARP inhibitors have shown promise as maintenance therapy, and for those who have tumors that respond to platinum-based chemotherapy. Some of the most impressive data was from the SOLO-1 trial, which showed a significant improvement in progression-free survival with olaparib (Lynparza) as frontline maintenance therapy for patients with BRCA-positive advanced ovarian cancer.  

Any high-grade serous tumors, even ones that are not associated with BRCA1/2 mutations, have responded to PARP inhibitors, which Berek says is a major advance. PARP inhibitors are also oral, making them convenient for the patients, and well tolerated. It is a great improvement in quality of life, Berek says. The goal is to create more customized targeted therapies so that people can live longer, fuller lives.
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Jonathan S. Berek, MD, MMS, Laurie Kraus Lacob Professor, Stanford University School of Medicine, director, Stanford Women’s Cancer Center, senior advisor, Stanford Cancer Institute, discusses the impact of PARP inhibitors on the treatment landscape of ovarian cancer.

Recently, PARP inhibitors have caused the biggest shift in the landscape of ovarian cancer, according to Berek. PARP inhibitors have shown promise as maintenance therapy, and for those who have tumors that respond to platinum-based chemotherapy. Some of the most impressive data was from the SOLO-1 trial, which showed a significant improvement in progression-free survival with olaparib (Lynparza) as frontline maintenance therapy for patients with BRCA-positive advanced ovarian cancer.  

Any high-grade serous tumors, even ones that are not associated with BRCA1/2 mutations, have responded to PARP inhibitors, which Berek says is a major advance. PARP inhibitors are also oral, making them convenient for the patients, and well tolerated. It is a great improvement in quality of life, Berek says. The goal is to create more customized targeted therapies so that people can live longer, fuller lives.

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