Dr. Carey on QOL Changes Seen in Patients With Breast Cancer

Lisa Carey, MD
Published: Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016



Lisa Carey, MD, associate director, Clinical Research, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Richardson and Marilyn Jacobs Preyer Distinguished Professorship for Breast Cancer Research, UNC-Chapel Hill, discusses how she has seen various agents impact quality of life (QOL) when used to treat patients with breast cancer.

An obvious example of taking toxicity into account is the adverse event of neuropathy, which is a common side effect associated with an adjuvant taxane therapy, Carey explains. While taxanes are among the most effective treatments for patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer in the first-line setting, it may not be a good idea to continue therapy with a taxane for a patient with a severe case of neuropathy.

For other patients, gastrointestinal toxicities may be particularly bothersome and may be a reason to switch treatments. However, there are other patients for whom adherence is difficult; therefore, intravenous therapy may be more convenient for them. From the standpoint of tolerability and preference, that may also be an important reason to individualize therapy, Carey adds.


Lisa Carey, MD, associate director, Clinical Research, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Richardson and Marilyn Jacobs Preyer Distinguished Professorship for Breast Cancer Research, UNC-Chapel Hill, discusses how she has seen various agents impact quality of life (QOL) when used to treat patients with breast cancer.

An obvious example of taking toxicity into account is the adverse event of neuropathy, which is a common side effect associated with an adjuvant taxane therapy, Carey explains. While taxanes are among the most effective treatments for patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer in the first-line setting, it may not be a good idea to continue therapy with a taxane for a patient with a severe case of neuropathy.

For other patients, gastrointestinal toxicities may be particularly bothersome and may be a reason to switch treatments. However, there are other patients for whom adherence is difficult; therefore, intravenous therapy may be more convenient for them. From the standpoint of tolerability and preference, that may also be an important reason to individualize therapy, Carey adds.



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