Dr. Cho Discusses Role of Bispecific Agents in Myeloma

Hearn Jay Cho, MD, PhD
Published: Monday, Feb 11, 2019



Hearn Jay Cho, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, Hematology/Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, discusses the role of bispecific agents in the treatment of patients with myeloma.

Bispecific agents are interesting because early efficacy data have been comparable to those seen with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy; however, Cho says, this class of drugs is more easily administered than CAR T cells. All of these T-cell–directed therapies—bispecific agents, CAR T cells, and engineered T-cell receptors—are similar in that they are testing the theory of whether a genetically modified T cell can have a similar effect to that seen with a naturally produced T cell directed towards an antigen expressed in the tumor cell.

Broadly speaking, antitumor immunity is trying to hijack natural antivirus immune response and redirect that response towards eliminating tumor cells. The challenge is to understand whether engineering a T cell with an artificial receptor or artificially bringing it together externally with a bispecific agent is going to be equivalent to that natural immune response. This is a very important area of research, Cho says, and understanding the mechanism of action becomes key.
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Hearn Jay Cho, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, Hematology/Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, discusses the role of bispecific agents in the treatment of patients with myeloma.

Bispecific agents are interesting because early efficacy data have been comparable to those seen with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy; however, Cho says, this class of drugs is more easily administered than CAR T cells. All of these T-cell–directed therapies—bispecific agents, CAR T cells, and engineered T-cell receptors—are similar in that they are testing the theory of whether a genetically modified T cell can have a similar effect to that seen with a naturally produced T cell directed towards an antigen expressed in the tumor cell.

Broadly speaking, antitumor immunity is trying to hijack natural antivirus immune response and redirect that response towards eliminating tumor cells. The challenge is to understand whether engineering a T cell with an artificial receptor or artificially bringing it together externally with a bispecific agent is going to be equivalent to that natural immune response. This is a very important area of research, Cho says, and understanding the mechanism of action becomes key.



View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: 14th Annual International Symposium on Melanoma and Other Cutaneous Malignancies®Apr 30, 20192.0
Oncology Consultations®: The Advancing Role of CAR T-Cell Therapies in Hematologic MalignanciesApr 30, 20191.5
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