Dr. Coleman on Implications of the VELIA Trial in Ovarian Cancer

Robert L. Coleman, MD, FACOG, FACS
Published: Tuesday, Jan 21, 2020



Robert L. Coleman, MD, FACOG, FACS, professor and Ann Rife Cox Chair in Gynecology, Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, Division of Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses the implications of the phase III VELIA trial in ovarian cancer.

In the VELIA trial, the frontline combination of veliparib and chemotherapy followed by maintenance veliparib reduced the risk of progression or death by 32% versus placebo/chemotherapy followed by placebo maintenance in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer. The results are going to impact treatment strategies for women who have already been exposed to PARP inhibitors, says Coleman.

Generally, all of the trials that have led to FDA approvals were done in patients who had never been exposed to PARP inhibitors before. With this trial, and experience with olaparib (Lynparza) and niraparib (Zejula), more patients are going to be exposed to PARP earlier on in their treatment course, says Coleman. While, it's good to have these agents in the public domain, the field is going to have to figure out how this will affect the treatment paradigm for patients who recur and who have had prior exposure to PARP inhibitors, concludes Coleman.
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Robert L. Coleman, MD, FACOG, FACS, professor and Ann Rife Cox Chair in Gynecology, Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, Division of Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses the implications of the phase III VELIA trial in ovarian cancer.

In the VELIA trial, the frontline combination of veliparib and chemotherapy followed by maintenance veliparib reduced the risk of progression or death by 32% versus placebo/chemotherapy followed by placebo maintenance in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer. The results are going to impact treatment strategies for women who have already been exposed to PARP inhibitors, says Coleman.

Generally, all of the trials that have led to FDA approvals were done in patients who had never been exposed to PARP inhibitors before. With this trial, and experience with olaparib (Lynparza) and niraparib (Zejula), more patients are going to be exposed to PARP earlier on in their treatment course, says Coleman. While, it's good to have these agents in the public domain, the field is going to have to figure out how this will affect the treatment paradigm for patients who recur and who have had prior exposure to PARP inhibitors, concludes Coleman.



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