Dr. Coleman on Ongoing Research in Cervical Cancer

Robert L. Coleman, MD, FACOG, FACS
Published: Wednesday, Nov 13, 2019



Robert L. Coleman, MD, FACOG, FACS, professor and Ann Rife Cox Chair in Gynecology, Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, Division of Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses ongoing research efforts in cervical cancer.

Several phase III trials are ongoing in cervical cancer; some are sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, while others are sponsored by industry, says Coleman. Many combination strategies are of interest, including chemotherapy plus checkpoint inhibitors, as well as chemotherapy/bevacizumab (Avastin) plus atezolizumab (Tecentriq). The combination of chemotherapy and bevacizumab has already demonstrated activity in patients with cervical cancer, so investigators are hopeful that the addition of atezolizumab could provide even greater benefit.

Patients are the root of all this research, adds Coleman, and they need to be thanked for their participation on these trials. Given that the field does not have unlimited resources, investigators need to be smart about how trials are designed and run. Moreover, those currently working in the space should take the time to develop the future investigator, therein ensuring clinical discovery for years to come, concludes Coleman.
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Robert L. Coleman, MD, FACOG, FACS, professor and Ann Rife Cox Chair in Gynecology, Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, Division of Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses ongoing research efforts in cervical cancer.

Several phase III trials are ongoing in cervical cancer; some are sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, while others are sponsored by industry, says Coleman. Many combination strategies are of interest, including chemotherapy plus checkpoint inhibitors, as well as chemotherapy/bevacizumab (Avastin) plus atezolizumab (Tecentriq). The combination of chemotherapy and bevacizumab has already demonstrated activity in patients with cervical cancer, so investigators are hopeful that the addition of atezolizumab could provide even greater benefit.

Patients are the root of all this research, adds Coleman, and they need to be thanked for their participation on these trials. Given that the field does not have unlimited resources, investigators need to be smart about how trials are designed and run. Moreover, those currently working in the space should take the time to develop the future investigator, therein ensuring clinical discovery for years to come, concludes Coleman.



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