Dr. Concepcion on Robotic Surgery Adverse Event Spikes

Raoul S. Concepcion, MD
Published: Friday, May 24, 2013

Raoul S. Concepcion, MD, editor-in-chief, Urologists in Cancer Care, Director of Clinical Research, Urologic Surgeon, Urology Associates, PC, Nashville, TN, discusses a recent FDA investigation into spikes in reported adverse events associated with the use of robotic-assisted surgery.

Urologists have been the mainstay in using robotic-assisted technology, specifically in the management of prostate cancer, Concepcion suggests. Along these lines, urologists have historically been the main driver behind robotic programs in hospitals. However, now, Concepcion says, like any new technology, robotic surgery is being utilized by other surgical subspecialties, including general surgery and gynecology.

New challenges and complications may arise when subspecialties begin using robotic surgery, Concepcion believes, particularly since this type of surgery may not be part of their inherent training. As a result, specialized courses are required, with exact needs varying based on institutional guidelines.

In summary, Concepcion notes, although urologists are the main specialty that utilizes robotic surgery, the increased rate of adverse events may not be strictly from urology. Instead, he adds, it may be a result of robotic surgery moving into other specialties.

Raoul S. Concepcion, MD, editor-in-chief, Urologists in Cancer Care, Director of Clinical Research, Urologic Surgeon, Urology Associates, PC, Nashville, TN, discusses a recent FDA investigation into spikes in reported adverse events associated with the use of robotic-assisted surgery.

Urologists have been the mainstay in using robotic-assisted technology, specifically in the management of prostate cancer, Concepcion suggests. Along these lines, urologists have historically been the main driver behind robotic programs in hospitals. However, now, Concepcion says, like any new technology, robotic surgery is being utilized by other surgical subspecialties, including general surgery and gynecology.

New challenges and complications may arise when subspecialties begin using robotic surgery, Concepcion believes, particularly since this type of surgery may not be part of their inherent training. As a result, specialized courses are required, with exact needs varying based on institutional guidelines.

In summary, Concepcion notes, although urologists are the main specialty that utilizes robotic surgery, the increased rate of adverse events may not be strictly from urology. Instead, he adds, it may be a result of robotic surgery moving into other specialties.


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