Dr. Dalgleish on IMM-101 With Gemcitabine for Pancreatic Cancer

Angus Dalgleish, MD
Published: Wednesday, Jun 10, 2015



Angus Dalgleish, MD, FRCP, FRACP, FRCPath, FMedSci, professor, Department of Oncology, St. George's, University of London, discusses a study that examined the combination of an immunomodulator with gemcitabine in patients with pancreatic cancer.

The randomized phase II study compared IMM-101, a bacterially derived systemic immunomodulator, in combination with gemcitabine with gemcitabine alone. The patient population was deemed ineligible to receive FOLFIRINOX or nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane). The majority of patients had metastatic disease, Dalgleish adds.

Results showed that the combination demonstrated an increase in survival over gemcitabine alone. IMM-101 is an injectable drug with no obvious additive toxicities, making it a novel agent in the first-line setting for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, Dalgleish explains.
 


Angus Dalgleish, MD, FRCP, FRACP, FRCPath, FMedSci, professor, Department of Oncology, St. George's, University of London, discusses a study that examined the combination of an immunomodulator with gemcitabine in patients with pancreatic cancer.

The randomized phase II study compared IMM-101, a bacterially derived systemic immunomodulator, in combination with gemcitabine with gemcitabine alone. The patient population was deemed ineligible to receive FOLFIRINOX or nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane). The majority of patients had metastatic disease, Dalgleish adds.

Results showed that the combination demonstrated an increase in survival over gemcitabine alone. IMM-101 is an injectable drug with no obvious additive toxicities, making it a novel agent in the first-line setting for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, Dalgleish explains.
 

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Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Oncology Briefings™: Integrating Novel Targeted Treatment Strategies to Advance Pancreatic Cancer CareNov 30, 20181.0
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