Dr. Deininger on the Role of Genetic Instability in Mutations That Lead to Cancer

Prescott Deininger, PhD
Published: Wednesday, May 27, 2015



Prescott Deininger, PhD, Professor and Regents Distinguished Chair, director, Tulane Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, discusses how genetic instability plays a role in the discovery and treatment of mutations that may lead to specific tumor types.

The common theme across tumor types is genetic instability, though there are various types of instability, Deininger explains. These variations need to be further studied by researchers.

Genetic instability is necessary for a cancer to progress, Deininger says. However, cancer cells will die if there is too much instability. It is more effective for researchers to examine cells that have a smaller amount of instability and target them with radiation therapy or genotoxic compounds.



Prescott Deininger, PhD, Professor and Regents Distinguished Chair, director, Tulane Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, discusses how genetic instability plays a role in the discovery and treatment of mutations that may lead to specific tumor types.

The common theme across tumor types is genetic instability, though there are various types of instability, Deininger explains. These variations need to be further studied by researchers.

Genetic instability is necessary for a cancer to progress, Deininger says. However, cancer cells will die if there is too much instability. It is more effective for researchers to examine cells that have a smaller amount of instability and target them with radiation therapy or genotoxic compounds.




View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: CDK4/6 Inhibitors With the Experts: The Role of Emerging Agents for the Management of Metastatic Breast CancerMay 30, 20182.0
Medical Crossfire®: Clinical Updates on PARP Inhibition and its Evolving Use in the Treatment of CancersMay 30, 20181.5
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x