Dr. Denduluri on Treatment for ER+/HER2- Breast Cancer

Neelima Denduluri, MD
Published: Monday, Mar 04, 2019



Neelima Denduluri, MD, medical oncologist, Virginia Cancer Specialists, discusses treatment for patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer.

There are several therapies available for patients with ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer. Although CDK4/6 inhibitors have transformed the way these patients are treated, physicians have had access to potent targeted therapies for decades, including tamoxifen, fulvestrant, aromatase inhibitors, and other anti-estrogen agents. However, these agents used in combination with CDK4/6 inhibitors have resulted in tremendous strides for patients with stage IV breast cancer, says Denduluri. Further, physicians are anticipating the introduction of the PIK3CA inhibitor, alpelisib (BYL719).

The CDK4/6 inhibitors have transformed how physicians treat ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer in the metastatic setting, adds Denduluri. They’ve delayed the time to chemotherapy by more than double that of historical standards. All 3 inhibitors––ribociclib (Kisqali), palbociclib (Ibrance), and abemaciclib (Verzenio) are oral drugs that enhance the efficacy of current anti-estrogen therapy. Regardless of the extent of disease, age of the patient, or pre/postmenopausal status, CDK4/6 inhibitors improve outcomes for patients when used in combination with anti-estrogen therapy, concludes Denduluri.
SELECTED
LANGUAGE


Neelima Denduluri, MD, medical oncologist, Virginia Cancer Specialists, discusses treatment for patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer.

There are several therapies available for patients with ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer. Although CDK4/6 inhibitors have transformed the way these patients are treated, physicians have had access to potent targeted therapies for decades, including tamoxifen, fulvestrant, aromatase inhibitors, and other anti-estrogen agents. However, these agents used in combination with CDK4/6 inhibitors have resulted in tremendous strides for patients with stage IV breast cancer, says Denduluri. Further, physicians are anticipating the introduction of the PIK3CA inhibitor, alpelisib (BYL719).

The CDK4/6 inhibitors have transformed how physicians treat ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer in the metastatic setting, adds Denduluri. They’ve delayed the time to chemotherapy by more than double that of historical standards. All 3 inhibitors––ribociclib (Kisqali), palbociclib (Ibrance), and abemaciclib (Verzenio) are oral drugs that enhance the efficacy of current anti-estrogen therapy. Regardless of the extent of disease, age of the patient, or pre/postmenopausal status, CDK4/6 inhibitors improve outcomes for patients when used in combination with anti-estrogen therapy, concludes Denduluri.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: How Do We Leverage PARP Inhibition Strategies in the Contemporary Treatment of Breast Cancer?May 31, 20191.5
Community Practice Connections™: A Better Way to Stop Pain: Paths Toward Responsible Postsurgical Pain Management for Patients With Breast CancerMay 31, 20191.5
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x