Dr. Dowdy on the Association of Molecular Subtypes and Responses to Bevacizumab in Ovarian Cancer

Sean C. Dowdy, MD
Published: Wednesday, Jul 23, 2014

Sean C. Dowdy, MD, professor, chair, Division of Gynecologic Surgery, co-leader, Women’s Cancer Program, Mayo Clinic, discusses the association of molecular subtypes and responses to bevacizumab in ovarian cancer.

In the ICON7 study, it was shown that adding first-line bevacizumab to carboplatin and paclitaxel for the treatment of ovarian cancer improves progression-free survival, but not overall survival.

The goal of this analysis, which Dowdy discusses, was to determine if response to bevacizumab was associated with a molecular classification (differentiated, immunoreactive, mesenchymal and proliferative) as described by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. It was seen that the proliferative and mesenchymal groups responded better to bevacizumab.

Sean C. Dowdy, MD, professor, chair, Division of Gynecologic Surgery, co-leader, Women’s Cancer Program, Mayo Clinic, discusses the association of molecular subtypes and responses to bevacizumab in ovarian cancer.

In the ICON7 study, it was shown that adding first-line bevacizumab to carboplatin and paclitaxel for the treatment of ovarian cancer improves progression-free survival, but not overall survival.

The goal of this analysis, which Dowdy discusses, was to determine if response to bevacizumab was associated with a molecular classification (differentiated, immunoreactive, mesenchymal and proliferative) as described by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. It was seen that the proliferative and mesenchymal groups responded better to bevacizumab.




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