Dr. Dreicer on Next-Generation AR Therapies in CRPC

Robert Dreicer, MD
Published: Monday, Apr 14, 2014

Robert Dreicer, MD, MS, professor of medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, chairman, Department of Solid Tumor Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, discusses the development of next-generation anti-androgen therapies for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

Dreicer says developing next-generation androgen receptor (AR) therapies is challenging because many have similar activity to drugs that are already approved. For example, orteronel, an androgen synthesis inhibitor, was unable to meet its primary endpoint of improvement in overall survival compared with placebo in a phase III trial.

In order to gain approval, new AR-targeted drugs must be dramatically better than the drugs that are already available, Dreicer says.
 
Robert Dreicer, MD, MS, professor of medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, chairman, Department of Solid Tumor Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, discusses the development of next-generation anti-androgen therapies for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

Dreicer says developing next-generation androgen receptor (AR) therapies is challenging because many have similar activity to drugs that are already approved. For example, orteronel, an androgen synthesis inhibitor, was unable to meet its primary endpoint of improvement in overall survival compared with placebo in a phase III trial.

In order to gain approval, new AR-targeted drugs must be dramatically better than the drugs that are already available, Dreicer says.
 



View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
35th Annual Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium: Innovative Cancer Therapy for Tomorrow® Clinical Vignette SeriesJan 31, 20192.0
Oncology Briefings™: Current Perspectives on Preventing and Managing Tumor Lysis SyndromeJun 30, 20191.0
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x