Dr. English on an Investigational Antibody-Drug Conjugate in Ovarian Cancer

Diana P. English, MD
Published: Thursday, Jan 24, 2019



Diana P. English, MD, a gynecologic oncologist at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, discusses an investigational antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) in ovarian cancer.

In addition to mirvetuximab soravtansine, there are other ADCs targeting other antigens or proteins that are overexpressed in ovarian cancer, says English. One target is mesothelin, which is expressed on the majority of ovarian cancers. The investigational ADC, anetumab ravtansine, targets the mesothelin protein. This ADC is also conjugated to the antimicrotubular agent DM4, she explains. Although the ADC has shown some promise in ovarian cancer, more meaningful responses were observed in mesothelioma. Nonetheless, a phase II trial is evaluating the use of this agent in combination with bevacizumab (Avastin) versus bevacizumab plus paclitaxel in patients with platinum-resistant disease.

The appeal of ADCs is the potential for them to be very specific to a particular target protein, or antigen overexpressed in ovarian cancer and spare normal tissue, adds English, resulting in not only better outcomes but less adverse events.
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Diana P. English, MD, a gynecologic oncologist at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, discusses an investigational antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) in ovarian cancer.

In addition to mirvetuximab soravtansine, there are other ADCs targeting other antigens or proteins that are overexpressed in ovarian cancer, says English. One target is mesothelin, which is expressed on the majority of ovarian cancers. The investigational ADC, anetumab ravtansine, targets the mesothelin protein. This ADC is also conjugated to the antimicrotubular agent DM4, she explains. Although the ADC has shown some promise in ovarian cancer, more meaningful responses were observed in mesothelioma. Nonetheless, a phase II trial is evaluating the use of this agent in combination with bevacizumab (Avastin) versus bevacizumab plus paclitaxel in patients with platinum-resistant disease.

The appeal of ADCs is the potential for them to be very specific to a particular target protein, or antigen overexpressed in ovarian cancer and spare normal tissue, adds English, resulting in not only better outcomes but less adverse events.

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