Dr. George on the Importance of Collaboration in the Treatment of Uterine Sarcomas

Suzanne George, MD
Published: Thursday, Apr 04, 2019



Suzanne George, MD, director of Clinical Research, Center for Sarcoma and Bone Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and an associate professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, discusses the importance of collaboration in the treatment of patients with uterine sarcoma.

Uterine sarcoma is a rare tumor that can be treated by many different modalities, explains George. As such, collaboration is key capitalizing on every specialist’s strength to bring the best treatments to patients. Leiomyosarcoma cannot be cured by chemotherapy alone, but there are scenarios in which chemotherapy can play a significant role in controlling the disease and helping to improve quality of life, says George. As a field, there needs to be more of a focus on balancing survival with quality of life through collaborative efforts.

Additionally, more research needs to be done on the fundamentals of biology to discover potential susceptibilities and vulnerabilities of the tumor. Naturally, science will progress in that regard, but it is up to physicians to bring this to the patients, George concludes.
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Suzanne George, MD, director of Clinical Research, Center for Sarcoma and Bone Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and an associate professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, discusses the importance of collaboration in the treatment of patients with uterine sarcoma.

Uterine sarcoma is a rare tumor that can be treated by many different modalities, explains George. As such, collaboration is key capitalizing on every specialist’s strength to bring the best treatments to patients. Leiomyosarcoma cannot be cured by chemotherapy alone, but there are scenarios in which chemotherapy can play a significant role in controlling the disease and helping to improve quality of life, says George. As a field, there needs to be more of a focus on balancing survival with quality of life through collaborative efforts.

Additionally, more research needs to be done on the fundamentals of biology to discover potential susceptibilities and vulnerabilities of the tumor. Naturally, science will progress in that regard, but it is up to physicians to bring this to the patients, George concludes.



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