Dr. Halmos on Detecting Actionable Mutations in Patients With Lung Cancer

Balazs Halmos, MD
Published: Tuesday, Oct 07, 2014

Balazs Halmos, MD, section chief of Thoracic Oncology at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, comments on the detection of actionable mutations in patients with lung cancer.

CO-1686 and AZD9291 represent examples of two drugs that only benefit patients with EGFR mutations, Halmos says, ​which is 10-15% of all patients with lung cancer.

For a community oncologist, it is important to look at all patients and classify them by their actionable mutation. This poses a problem, though, as more testing is needed. It is crucial for a community oncologist to be aligned with a comprehensive cancer center for its expertise in medical oncology and treatment, but also for its expertise in pathological genetics.

Balazs Halmos, MD, section chief of Thoracic Oncology at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, comments on the detection of actionable mutations in patients with lung cancer.

CO-1686 and AZD9291 represent examples of two drugs that only benefit patients with EGFR mutations, Halmos says, ​which is 10-15% of all patients with lung cancer.

For a community oncologist, it is important to look at all patients and classify them by their actionable mutation. This poses a problem, though, as more testing is needed. It is crucial for a community oncologist to be aligned with a comprehensive cancer center for its expertise in medical oncology and treatment, but also for its expertise in pathological genetics.


View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: 18th Annual International Lung Cancer Congress®Oct 31, 20181.5
Clinical Interchange™: Translating Research to Inform Changing Paradigms: Assessment of Emerging Immuno-Oncology Strategies and Combinations across Lung, Head and Neck, and Bladder CancersOct 31, 20182.0
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