Dr. Humphrey on Mogamulizumab for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

Jeffrey Humphrey, MD
Published: Monday, Jul 02, 2018



Jeffrey Humphrey, MD, president, Kyowa Hakko Kirin Pharma, Inc., discusses the benefits of mogamulizumab for the treatment of patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) that were reported in the phase III MAVORIC trial, which was presented at the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting.

Mogamulizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against CCR4.

The results of the study, involving 372 randomized patients, showed more than 60% of patients reported significant clinical improvement in symptoms under mogamulizumab from pretreatment baseline. Humphrey adds that more patients showed clinical improvement from mogamulizumab than with vorinostat (Zolinza). The time to symptomatic worsening for mogamulizumab was 27 months compared with 7 months for those under vorinostat.

This is important, Humphrey says, because patients with CTCL experience harsh symptoms. The malignant cells invade their skill, creating disfiguring tumors that can weep. Contractible itching, insomnia, and difficulty concentrating can also occur.
 
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Jeffrey Humphrey, MD, president, Kyowa Hakko Kirin Pharma, Inc., discusses the benefits of mogamulizumab for the treatment of patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) that were reported in the phase III MAVORIC trial, which was presented at the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting.

Mogamulizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against CCR4.

The results of the study, involving 372 randomized patients, showed more than 60% of patients reported significant clinical improvement in symptoms under mogamulizumab from pretreatment baseline. Humphrey adds that more patients showed clinical improvement from mogamulizumab than with vorinostat (Zolinza). The time to symptomatic worsening for mogamulizumab was 27 months compared with 7 months for those under vorinostat.

This is important, Humphrey says, because patients with CTCL experience harsh symptoms. The malignant cells invade their skill, creating disfiguring tumors that can weep. Contractible itching, insomnia, and difficulty concentrating can also occur.
 

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