Dr. Jochelson on Breast Cancer Screening Techniques

Maxine S. Jochelson, MD
Published: Thursday, Apr 19, 2012

Maxine S. Jochelson, MD, Director of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering’s Breast and Imaging Center, Associate Professor, Weill Cornell School of Medicine, explains supplemental screening techniques that can be used for patients that are at high-risk of developing breast cancer, but do not have access to MRIs.

Jochelson explains that while MRI is the preferred method for breast cancer screening not everyone lives in a community where it is available. As a result, researchers are looking for substitutes that are just as reliable for patients without access or at intermediate risk of developing breast cancer.

Many of the other complimentary methods of screening currently under investigation include tomosynthesis, contrast enhanced mammography, radionuclide imaging, and screening ultrasound.

Jochelson notes that radionuclide imaging releases too much radiation to be considered a candidate for yearly screening. She maintains hope for screening ultrasound because of its advantages over other complementary methods, but notes that excessive detection of benign lesions is holding it back.

Maxine S. Jochelson, MD, Director of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering’s Breast and Imaging Center, Associate Professor, Weill Cornell School of Medicine, explains supplemental screening techniques that can be used for patients that are at high-risk of developing breast cancer, but do not have access to MRIs.

Jochelson explains that while MRI is the preferred method for breast cancer screening not everyone lives in a community where it is available. As a result, researchers are looking for substitutes that are just as reliable for patients without access or at intermediate risk of developing breast cancer.

Many of the other complimentary methods of screening currently under investigation include tomosynthesis, contrast enhanced mammography, radionuclide imaging, and screening ultrasound.

Jochelson notes that radionuclide imaging releases too much radiation to be considered a candidate for yearly screening. She maintains hope for screening ultrasound because of its advantages over other complementary methods, but notes that excessive detection of benign lesions is holding it back.


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