Dr. Kipps on Ibrutinib and Idelalisib For CLL

Thomas J. Kipps, MD, PhD
Published: Wednesday, Feb 25, 2015



Thomas Kipps, MD, PhD, Division of Hematology-Oncology Deputy Director for Research at the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, discusses the mechanisms of ibrutinib and idelalisib for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).

These agents work by inhibiting the ability of leukemic cells to migrate and move toward the lymph nodes and the spleen, where they can survive, explains Kipps. This causes the leukemic cells to empty out from the lymph node compartments and the white cell count to rise substantially.

It is important to understand how ibrutinib and idelalisib work so that oncologists can manage clinical responses and try and improve on these responses by combining ibrutinib and idelalisib with different agents.
 


Thomas Kipps, MD, PhD, Division of Hematology-Oncology Deputy Director for Research at the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, discusses the mechanisms of ibrutinib and idelalisib for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).

These agents work by inhibiting the ability of leukemic cells to migrate and move toward the lymph nodes and the spleen, where they can survive, explains Kipps. This causes the leukemic cells to empty out from the lymph node compartments and the white cell count to rise substantially.

It is important to understand how ibrutinib and idelalisib work so that oncologists can manage clinical responses and try and improve on these responses by combining ibrutinib and idelalisib with different agents.
 

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